Corbyn or Bust? By William Bowles

24 May 2018 — Investigatingimperialism

I need to continue my previous essay, it remains woefully incomplete. I kinda hinted at it in the last para but never completed the thought.

Then I got an email from a comrade and friend in NYC after I’d published it:

Thanks, but the question left unanswered is: does the road to “regroupment” or whatever you want to call run through supporting Corbyn or opposing Corbyn and the LP? To me it’s the same question that was faced in Greece 2015. Did regroupment require supporting or opposing Syriza. And in either case, why? And what is the alternative?

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The Corbyn Effect By William Bowles

23 May 2018 — InvestigatingImperialism

Why should it be that in a climate that’s shifted so far to the right, that out of the morass that is contemporary Britain, there should emerge a politician who was shaped by and effectively still lives, in a world that no longer exists? It’s bizarre to say the least but how to explain it?

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The fallacy, and the failure of reformism By William Bowles

27 June 2016

So I turn on the TV and up comes a BBC reporter, and the first words I hear are, “but the word that comes to mind regarding Mr Corbyn’s performance on campaigning to remain in the EU, is lacklustre…that’s what everybody is saying”. The reporter went on to blame Corbyn for the result because he didn’t campaign hard enough to Remain.

And yes, for once the BBC reporter is absolutely correct, Corbyn was, well less than lacklustre I’d say but the guy was caught between a rock and a hard place and surrounded by enemies within his own camp (thankfully all departed now). He would have had to stand up and be counted but I don’t think he has what it takes and we have to ask the question why? Why didn’t he appeal directly to those who elected him, the ‘forgotten ones’, the bottom 30% that the ‘good life’ in the EU has not only passed by but ripped them off for the past forty years. The ones who voted for Corbyn but who ironically also tipped the balance in the Referendum vote. Had Corbyn followed through and supported Brexit, I think the winning percentage would have been even higher.

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Corbyn’s jobs for the boys By William Bowles

28 September 2015

So socialist Jeremy Corbyn, after pressure from the trade union boys who bankroll him, agreed not to make Trident an issue. After all, making nuclear missiles and the submarines that carry them, are jobs for the boys.

“Earlier Mr McCluskey said [the] Unite [trade union] was sympathetic to the argument that Trident nuclear weapons were expensive but added that not renewing the multi-billion pound system would cost some workers their jobs.

“He told a fringe meeting in Brighton: “We won’t be voting in favour of any anti-Trident resolution.The unions who were opposed to Trident are likely to carry the day and that is the way it is, that is the reality.”” – ‘Jeremy Corbyn loses the battle on Trident after trade unionists side with Labour MPs to block the move‘, the Independent, 27 September 2015

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Corbyn’s Dilemma By William Bowles

18 September 2015

‘The road to hell is paved with good intentions’

I’m really torn writing this, for on the one hand, Jeremy Corbyn’s (JC) sudden materialisation in the midst of a rampant, Victorian-style imperialist England, like Doctor Who landing in the Tardis, it’s difficult  not to join in the euphoria currently sweeping through what’s left of the left in England  (the current Media Lens has an excellent description of this) and bow down before JC, an almost Christ-like apparition right in the middle of the gangster capitalists in Armani suits who rule us.

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